Join Me in Alaska – LIVE!

If you haven’t already virtually followed me to Alaska, come and “join me” – LIVE – on the Lindsay in the Arctic blog! As Science Curator here at the Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science, I am participating as an instructor for Science Communication at a Glaciology Summer School organized by the University of Alaska Fairbanks and supported by the National Science Foundation. I have joined 27 graduate students and 5 glaciology instructors from around the world in the tiny village of McCarthy, Alaska, and I am responsible for leading workshops on effective strategies for communicating science to the public. I am also keeping a blog to share this amazing experience with everyone, and have worked with scientists on writing and contributing posts for the blog too!

I have met amazing scientists here, seen spectacular glaciers, and learned more about how important healthy glaciers are to all of us – even in tropical Miami.

Click on the photos below to learn more about these amazing people and places. I’ll be here until the end of the week!

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The main “Lindsay in the Arctic” blog site

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McCarthy, Alaska, where the Glaciology Summer School is taking place

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A glacier from 2500 feet up! Every pattern and feature gives clues as to a glacier’s health, how it moves, and how it is affected by climate

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A glacier is a dynamic force of nature

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Just one of the 27 students in the Glaciology Summer School course (each one contributed a blog entry, which I have labeled “post from a scientist”)

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Students worked in groups on glaciology research projects, using tools like drones and on-ice weather stations, to learn more about glaciers and their connection to climate

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As part of my science communication workshops, I challenged students to “draw their research” in a simple picture, then develop a concept for a hands-on activity to illustrate that picture

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