Author Archives: lindsay

Project! Historic Photos, New Understanding

It can be a little overwhelming to think about something as massive as a glacier changing drastically over the course of a single generation. But that is happening, and we are using all kinds of tools, new and old, to … Continue reading

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Projects!

The reason that this Glaciology Summer School is happening in McCarthy, Alaska is because it is designed to be a chance for students to learn by experiencing, listening, trying, and doing. During each day, students listen to lectures from esteemed glaciology instructors … Continue reading

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Post from a Scientist: How Not to Get Lost on a Glacier

Have you ever used a compass to find your way through unfamiliar territory? Did you know that some thirty thousand years ago the compass needle would have pointed in the opposite direction? Yes, indeed, there have been times in the … Continue reading

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Glacier Gone: The Kennecott Kids

Kennecott is an old mining town a few miles down the road from McCarthy. Today the abandoned copper mine and the still remaining town looks like a postcard of red buildings with white trim and machinery inside, built between a … Continue reading

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Post from a Scientist: Glacier’s Slippery Shoes

Dealing with slippery surfaces is perhaps one of the very first physical phenomena that we deal with as kids. It is always challenging to keep your balance, not to fall down, or not to break your bones. Similar to any … Continue reading

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Post from a Scientist: Tropical Ice Caps

When I think of the tropics, I usually think of brightly-colored fish and palm trees. More recently, I also think about glaciers, which are not only in the polar regions, but also sometimes in the tropics as well. But as … Continue reading

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Post from a Scientist: Hearing the Ice

Imagine a valley filled with ice, from wall to wall, miles wide.  This is a photograph that I took of the Taku Glacier in Alaska when I first saw it, from an airplane: What’s underneath all that ice?  How deep … Continue reading

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Post from a Scientist: Ice Forecasts

The weather reports you watch on TV come from people who take measurements of today’s weather, and then let computers predict how it is going to change in the next few days. I do the same thing for the Juneau … Continue reading

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Moulins

The saying “don’t judge a book by its cover” might be adjusted to “don’t judge a glacier by its surface.” Glaciers are stunning beautiful, dynamic structures the size of mountains, but a lot of what scientists study, and what they … Continue reading

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Post from a Scientist: Greenland Ice, South Florida Water

I remember when I was walking on the Greenland ice sheet for the first time in summer 2012. It was nearly midnight, yet there was sunlight still reaching the ice surface. I had just finished a long day of field … Continue reading

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