Author Archives: lindsay

Post from a Scientist: The Depth of Snow

Have you ever wondered how deep snow can get in the mountains? How about on top of glaciers? After all, glaciers only exist because they get enough snow falling on them in the winter. Some scientists have been measuring snow … Continue reading

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Post from a Scientist: Freeways of Ice

Growing up I spent most summers playing in the creeks around my house in Santa Cruz, CA. The water flowing out of the ground and its connection to the water table fascinated me. I went to college and graduate school … Continue reading

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Post from a Scientist: Model Glaciers

What do you think of when you hear someone say “climate change”? Maybe you think of sea level rise, maybe fossil fuel usage, or maybe the future of polar bears. I think of computer modeling. The idea of computer modeling … Continue reading

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Post from a Scientist: The Gravity of Ice

Did you know that the force that keeps you on the ground changes from place to place?  This force is known as gravity and describes why apples fall from trees as well as why planets orbit the sun.  On the … Continue reading

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Cryoconite Holes: Tiny Features with Big Implications

Albedo is a fancy way of saying that you will feel cooler on a hot day if you wear a white t-shirt instead of a dark t-shirt. Anyone from Miami certainly knows that. But Alaskan glaciers know that too. Albedo refers … Continue reading

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Post from a Scientist: The House of Snow

I am Sathiya, from the Indian Institute of Technology in India, and I am doing my PhD in atmospheric sciences and climate change. You will laugh when you hear the reason why I got into my research field. It was … Continue reading

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Post from a Scientist: Seeing Underneath a Glacier

When you see the Greenland Ice Sheet for the first time, it’s very difficult to understand, intuitively, that it’s undergoing significant changes.  It’s enormous, and very still.  The nearest simile I can come up with is that it’s like looking … Continue reading

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Post from a Scientist: Melting Ice, Raising Sea Levels

  When you pour pancake batter on a griddle, it will spread out. And if you pour too much on the griddle, it will spread right over the edge. That’s exactly what’s happening today in Antarctica, but it’s the ice … Continue reading

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Post from a Scientist: Don’t Tell Me You’ve Never Heard of Surging Glaciers!

I live and work on the northernmost inhabited settlement on Earth, on the Norwegian archipelago of Svalbard. There, the land is 60% covered by glaciers, and our neighbors are polar bears. What better place to be to study glaciers? In … Continue reading

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Glaciers: Size, Beauty, Power + Environmental Importance

Mountains. Valleys. Canyons. I’m not talking about rocks. I’m talking about ice. Seeing these features in photos can hardly do a glacier justice. The sheer size, beauty, power, and environmental importance of these structures are almost incomprehensible. But scientists are … Continue reading

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