Final Route

We have completed 5726 miles in and around the Arctic Ocean! I gave you our navigational coordinates (along with temperatures) for anyone who wanted to track our route, and now here is our final, completed route, beginning and ending at our port in Kirkenes, Norway.

map

Here’s how the data is listed below:
Date
Latitude, Longitude
Air Temperature, Water Temperature

8/20
69°43’N, 30°03’E
15°C, 13°C

8/21
75°03’N, 46°22’E
8°C, 8°C

8/22
76°11’N, 50°32’E
7°C, 7°C

8/23
80°59’N, 72°55’E
3°C, 3°C

8/24
81°40’N, 88°52’E
1°C, 1°C

8/25
79°32’N, 105°32’E
1°C, 1°C

8/26
77°12’N, 124°50’E
0°C, 0°C

8/27
78°09’N, 125°48’E
0°C, 0°C

8/28
79°57’N, 125°59’E
0°C, 2°C

8/29
80°47’N, 125°42’E
0°C, -1°C

8/30
80°48’N, 132°37’E
0°C, -1°C

8/31
79°37’N, 143°19’E
-1°C, -1°C

9/1
80°37’N, 137°39’E
-2°C, -1°C

9/2
79°59’N, 152°01’E
-6°C, -1°C

9/3
80°13’N, 155°48’E
-2°C, -1°C

9/4
79°35’N, 148°05’E
1°C, 1°C

9/5
78°33’N, 133°45’E
0°C, 0°C

9/6
77°38’N, 125°51’E
1°C, 1°C

9/7
79°45’N, 125°46’E
3°C, 2°C

9/8
78°26’N, 125°53’E
0°C, 0°C

9/9
80°00’N, 115°25’E
0°C, -1°C

9/10
79°56’N, 107°42’E
-1°C, 0°C

9/11
82°03’N, 112°17’E
-4°, -1°

9/12
81°09’N, 105°37’ E
0°, -1°

9/13
81°15’N, 98°08’E
-2°, 0°

9/14
82°06’N, 97°01’E
-1°, -1°

9/15
84°24’N, 93°27’E
-2°, -1°

9/16
83°29’N, 90°01’E
-2°, -1°

9/17
82°29’N, 89°48’E
-1°, -1°

9/18
81°34’N, 81°05’E
-2°, -2°

9/19
80°46’N, 67°26’E
0°, 1°

9/20
77°20’N, 52°19’E
4°, 5°

9/21
72°47’N, 41°08’E
9°, 9°

9/22
69°45’N, 30°04’E
9°, 11°

This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to Final Route

  1. Nicki James says:

    What Is Something Your Going To Miss About This Expedition?

  2. Ariel Aenlle says:

    From this trip that you have take to the arctic what have you learned the most?

    • lindsay says:

      Dear Ariel, another tough question that it really hard to choose and answer. One of the coolest things that I knew in theory, but saw firsthand while onboard, was that climate is a big picture, and so many people onboard were specialists in specific fields, and were working on one piece of the picture (like ocean, ice, atmosphere, etc). But without working together, they would not be able to fit their piece of the puzzle into the bigger picture. So it’s really important to work together in science!

  3. Ariel Aenlle says:

    Now that you have traveled in the arctic, what’s one of the most interesting that you saw that is really scientific that people in the arctic would use on daily base on a ship like the one you have been on?

    • lindsay says:

      Hi Ariel, that’s a tough question, but to be honest I don’t think I ever realized, before seeing it with my own eyes, how we actually studied and took samples of water from the bottom of the ocean. That CTD instrument was really impressive that it could do that. But there were so many important pieces of equipment onboard – and that we deployed into the water or onto the ice – that it’s hard to pick!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>