Mini-Conference: Student Presentations

This Glaciology Summer School is an immersive experience if there ever was one. It’s “hands-on” (activities), “feet on” (glaciers), and “brains on” (lectures and projects). Students have been challenged with projects that have been guided by glaciology instructors and designed to give students further experience and understanding of glaciology research, data, and techniques. As the end of the course approaches, we had a “mini-conference” session to allow students time to present their work and their findings.

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Mini-Conference at The Porphyry

Interpreting GPS data from moving ice to work out glacier velocities and how it varies…

Using computer models to derive conditions at the base of a glacier, from glacier surface data…

Combining observations and simulations of Greenland’s Jakobshavn Isbrae glacier to gain a better understanding of how seasonal changes affect glacier flow speeds and more…

Gaining experience with the FEniCS Project to investigate how this tool can assist in glaciology research…

Building a computer model of the hydrology and sliding of the Kennicott glacier during summer conditions, especially considering the sliding generated by annual floods…

Building numerical schemes to describe the dynamics of Antarctic ice shelves and ice streams, and comparing the model to observations…

Aalyzing the seasonal surface mass balance of the Austfonna Ice Cap in Svalbard, Norway, using stake data…

Calculating the energy balance at the glacier surface, exploring the sensitivity of melt to meteorological variables…

Using airborne remote-sensing data to measure area and elevation changes of glaciers in Svalbard, and calculating long-term changes in the context of on-site glacier and meteorological measurements…

Analyzing time-series images of temperature and microwave data from the Antarctic Peninsula to investigate snow melt dynamics and compare to regional climate models…

Using a UAS (unmanned aircraft system, or drone) to collect new imagery of Kennicott Glacier and compare to existing data, to calculate changes over time and compare with predictions of glacier melt and motion…

It’s amazing what they accomplished in 10 days… and trust me, there are a LOT more details, so if you want to know more, just ask!

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